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Infrared Therapy News

Exploring the Fascinating Benefits of Ice Therapy: Insights from Andrew D Huberman's Research

Exploring the Fascinating Benefits of Ice Therapy: Insights from Andrew D Huberman's Research

Introduction: Ice therapy, also known as cold therapy or cryotherapy, has long been used for its potential health benefits. From reducing inflammation to enhancing recovery, this therapeutic technique has attracted significant attention from researchers and practitioners alike. One prominent figure shedding light on the science behind ice therapy is Andrew D Huberman, a notable neuroscientist and professor at Stanford University. In this blog post, we will delve into the captivating research conducted by Andrew D Huberman and uncover the potential benefits of ice therapy.

  1. The Physiology of Cold Exposure: Andrew D Huberman's research delves into the physiological responses triggered by cold exposure. When ice or cold is applied to the body, it constricts blood vessels, leading to vasoconstriction. This mechanism helps reduce inflammation, alleviate pain, and support the recovery process. Additionally, cold exposure activates the sympathetic nervous system, triggering the release of norepinephrine, a hormone and neurotransmitter associated with increased focus and alertness.

  2. Improved Recovery and Performance: Huberman's studies indicate that incorporating ice therapy into post-exercise recovery protocols may enhance muscle repair and reduce inflammation. By decreasing blood flow and metabolic activity in the affected area, ice therapy can potentially minimize tissue damage and promote faster recovery. Athletes and fitness enthusiasts often utilize ice baths or localized cold treatments to aid in muscle recovery and improve performance.

  3. Pain Management and Injury Rehabilitation: Ice therapy has long been recognized for its pain-relieving properties. The application of cold temperatures can help numb pain receptors and alleviate discomfort. Andrew D Huberman's research sheds light on the potential benefits of ice therapy in managing chronic pain conditions and facilitating injury rehabilitation. The reduction in inflammation and pain sensation may contribute to improved mobility and facilitate a faster return to physical activity.

  4. Neurological Benefits: Huberman's research delves into the effects of cold exposure on the nervous system. Cold temperatures stimulate the release of norepinephrine, which plays a crucial role in regulating attention and focus. Some studies suggest that ice therapy may help improve cognitive performance, increase alertness, and enhance mental clarity. However, further research is necessary to fully understand the extent of these neurological benefits.

  5. Psychological Effects: In addition to the physiological benefits, Andrew D Huberman's research also explores the psychological impact of ice therapy. Cold exposure activates the sympathetic nervous system, which can lead to increased arousal and heightened sensory awareness. Some individuals report feeling a sense of invigoration and improved mood after cold exposure. This aspect of ice therapy opens up intriguing possibilities for its potential use in mental health and well-being.

Conclusion: Andrew D Huberman's research provides valuable insights into the fascinating realm of ice therapy. From improved recovery and performance to pain management and potential neurological benefits, the application of cold temperatures has a wide range of potential therapeutic effects. However, it is important to note that individual responses to ice therapy may vary, and further research is needed to establish specific protocols and guidelines. If you are considering incorporating ice therapy into your routine, it is advisable to consult with a healthcare professional or trained practitioner to ensure safe and effective implementation

INCANDESCENT OR LED NIR BULBS: WHY NOT BOTH?

TheraBulb offers two different types of bulbs: incandescent and LED. We sell both types of bulbs because each one offers some features that the other does not. This not only makes them alternatives for each other, but also complementary. In this blog post we're going to discuss how using incandescent and LED bulbs together can offer you the best of both worlds.

THERABULB INCANDESCENT BULBS

TheraBulb offers two incandescent bulbs designed for use in countries with 220V-240V electrical systems, a 150W and 300W bulb.  220V - 240V electrical systems are used in most of world, including Africa, Asia, Europe, Oceania, and South America.

If you are not sure what voltage is used in your country, here is a guide to assist you.

THERABULB UNIVERSAL VOLTAGE LED BULBS

TheraBulb also offers a 5W universal voltage LED bulb that can be used worldwide. 

DIFFERENCES BETWEEN INCANDESCENT AND LED BULBS

Incandescent and LED bulbs differ in several ways.

INCANDESCENT VS LED TECHNOLOGY

The fundamental difference between incandescent bulbs is the way that they operate. Incandescent bulbs use the same technology that was patented by Thomas Edison in 1888. Inside each bulb is a wire filament, through which, electricity flows. This causes the filament to become so hot that it glows. It is this process that produces the visible light, infrared energy, and heat that TheraBulbs emit. The image below shows the inside of an incandescent TheraBulb.

infographic showing components of TheraBulb zero EMF incandescent infrared bulb

LED produce visible light and near infrared energy as a result of electrical current passing through a microchip, which causes the light emitting diodes (LEDs) to be energized. Unlike incandescent bulbs, in which a glowing filament produces visible light and near infrared energy in a range of wavelengths, LED bulbs can be programmed to emit wavelengths in precise ranges.  In the case of TheraBulb's LED bulbs, these ranges are:

  • Visible Light 600nm - 675nm
  • Near Infrared 800nm - 850nm

INCANDESCENT VS LED PERFORMANCE

Because the manner in which visible light and near infrared energy are produced by an LED bulb is reliant upon electronics, LED bulbs are able to deliver the same irradiance levels as incandescent bulbs, but with far less energy consumption.  For example, TheraBulb's 5W LED and 250W incandescent bulb have identical irradiance levels (0.11 mW/cm2 at .33M and .01 mW/cm2 at 1M).

Additionally, LED bulbs do not produce significant amounts of heat and, instead, get just slightly warm. In contrast, incandescent bulbs get very hot (512°F - 589°F).

USING INCANDESCENT AND LED BULBS TOGETHER

These differences in performance allow users to create a "best of both worlds" sauna array. You can increase the red light and near infrared energy output without significantly increasing the amount of heat produced or power consumed. Adding an LED bulb to a sauna array adds the same amount of red light and near infrared energy as a 250W incandescent bulb while increasing the power consumption a mere 2%. 

The ability to increase red light and infrared output without significantly increasing power consumption is important because you're limited by the capacity of your home's electrical system, which is 15 amps per circuit in most homes. 15 amps allows you to draw 1800 watts of power from one circuit at one time. A home typically has multiple circuits, each of which is comprised of as many as 25 outlets. Circuits generally cover multiple rooms in your home. This means that, while the circuit offers 1800 watts of power, it is unlikely that all 1800 watts will be available to operate your TheraBulbs. To learn more about determining the number of bulbs needed, check out our blog post titled How Many Bulbs Do I Need?.

PRECAUTION

Incandescent and LED bulbs can be used together in a sauna array, but, because incandescent bulbs get very hot and LED bulbs have a plastic housing, you will want to keep them at least .33M (~12 inches) apart.  This will prevent heat damage to the LED bulbs.  

LED bulbs are not recommended for use in saunas that reach temperatures above 150°F.

LEARN MORE AND SAVE

If you have questions that we didn't answer here, feel free to contact us at support@therabulb.co.uk And, when you're ready to purchase your bulbs, take advantage of our sauna owner discount, which gives you 15% off when you purchase four or more bulbs — mixing and matching sizes is welcome. Simply enter the word SAUNA at checkout.

Exploring the Fascinating Benefits of Ice Therapy: Insights from Andrew D Huberman's Research

Exploring the Fascinating Benefits of Ice Therapy: Insights from Andrew D Huberman's Research

Introduction: Ice therapy, also known as cold therapy or cryotherapy, has long been used for its potential health benefits. From reducing inflammation to enhancing recovery, this therapeutic technique has attracted significant attention from researchers and practitioners alike. One prominent figure shedding light on the science behind ice therapy is Andrew D Huberman, a notable neuroscientist and professor at Stanford University. In this blog post, we will delve into the captivating research conducted by Andrew D Huberman and uncover the potential benefits of ice therapy.

  1. The Physiology of Cold Exposure: Andrew D Huberman's research delves into the physiological responses triggered by cold exposure. When ice or cold is applied to the body, it constricts blood vessels, leading to vasoconstriction. This mechanism helps reduce inflammation, alleviate pain, and support the recovery process. Additionally, cold exposure activates the sympathetic nervous system, triggering the release of norepinephrine, a hormone and neurotransmitter associated with increased focus and alertness.

  2. Improved Recovery and Performance: Huberman's studies indicate that incorporating ice therapy into post-exercise recovery protocols may enhance muscle repair and reduce inflammation. By decreasing blood flow and metabolic activity in the affected area, ice therapy can potentially minimize tissue damage and promote faster recovery. Athletes and fitness enthusiasts often utilize ice baths or localized cold treatments to aid in muscle recovery and improve performance.

  3. Pain Management and Injury Rehabilitation: Ice therapy has long been recognized for its pain-relieving properties. The application of cold temperatures can help numb pain receptors and alleviate discomfort. Andrew D Huberman's research sheds light on the potential benefits of ice therapy in managing chronic pain conditions and facilitating injury rehabilitation. The reduction in inflammation and pain sensation may contribute to improved mobility and facilitate a faster return to physical activity.

  4. Neurological Benefits: Huberman's research delves into the effects of cold exposure on the nervous system. Cold temperatures stimulate the release of norepinephrine, which plays a crucial role in regulating attention and focus. Some studies suggest that ice therapy may help improve cognitive performance, increase alertness, and enhance mental clarity. However, further research is necessary to fully understand the extent of these neurological benefits.

  5. Psychological Effects: In addition to the physiological benefits, Andrew D Huberman's research also explores the psychological impact of ice therapy. Cold exposure activates the sympathetic nervous system, which can lead to increased arousal and heightened sensory awareness. Some individuals report feeling a sense of invigoration and improved mood after cold exposure. This aspect of ice therapy opens up intriguing possibilities for its potential use in mental health and well-being.

Conclusion: Andrew D Huberman's research provides valuable insights into the fascinating realm of ice therapy. From improved recovery and performance to pain management and potential neurological benefits, the application of cold temperatures has a wide range of potential therapeutic effects. However, it is important to note that individual responses to ice therapy may vary, and further research is needed to establish specific protocols and guidelines. If you are considering incorporating ice therapy into your routine, it is advisable to consult with a healthcare professional or trained practitioner to ensure safe and effective implementation.

What Are The Top 7 Benefits of Taking An Ice Bath

Ice baths, also known as cold water immersion or cold therapy, have been claimed to offer several potential benefits. Here are some of the benefits of taking ice baths:

  1. Reducing muscle soreness: Cold water immersion may help reduce muscle soreness by reducing inflammation and swelling, which are common after intense exercise or training. This can potentially aid in faster recovery and preparation for subsequent workouts.

  2. Enhancing recovery: Ice baths are believed to promote recovery by improving circulation and oxygen delivery to muscles and tissues, which may help flush out metabolic waste products and promote healing.

  3. Managing inflammation: Cold water immersion can cause vasoconstriction, which may help reduce inflammation and swelling associated with soft tissue injuries or conditions such as tendinitis.

  4. Pain relief: The cold temperature of ice baths may temporarily numb nerve endings, potentially providing pain relief for sore muscles or injured areas.

  5. Enhancing mood: Exposure to cold water may stimulate the release of endorphins, which are known as "feel-good" hormones. This can help elevate mood and promote relaxation, which may be beneficial for stress relief and mental well-being.

  6. Cooling the body: Ice baths can effectively lower body temperature, which may be helpful in managing heat stress or hyperthermia, especially in athletes who engage in intense physical activity in hot environments.

  7. Promoting sleep: Cold therapy has been reported to improve sleep quality in some individuals, possibly due to its relaxation and stress-reducing effects.

It's important to note that while some individuals may find ice baths beneficial, the scientific evidence on their effectiveness is mixed, and more research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and benefits. Ice baths may not be suitable for everyone, and it's crucial to consult with a qualified healthcare professional or sports medicine expert before incorporating ice baths or any other form of therapy into your routine, especially if you have any existing medical conditions.

Regenerate response

What Is An Ice Bath and How Does It Work?

An ice bath, also known as cold water immersion or cold therapy, is a therapeutic practice that involves immersing the body in cold water for a certain period of time. Typically, the water temperature ranges from 50 to 59 degrees Fahrenheit (10 to 15 degrees Celsius), although colder temperatures can also be used.

The process of an ice bath works by exposing the body to cold water, which can cause several physiological responses. When the body is submerged in cold water, blood vessels constrict, reducing blood flow to the muscles and other tissues. This vasoconstriction is believed to help reduce inflammation and swelling, as well as numb nerve endings, potentially resulting in pain relief.

The cold temperature also causes the body to respond by increasing its metabolic rate in an attempt to warm up. This increased metabolic activity may help improve circulation and oxygen delivery to muscles and tissues, potentially aiding in recovery.

Additionally, exposure to cold water may stimulate the release of certain hormones, such as endorphins, which can help elevate mood and promote relaxation.

Ice baths are commonly used by athletes and fitness enthusiasts as a recovery strategy after intense exercise or training sessions, with the goal of reducing muscle soreness, inflammation, and promoting recovery. However, the scientific evidence on the effectiveness of ice baths is mixed, and more research is needed to fully understand their mechanisms of action and benefits. It's important to note that ice baths may not be suitable for everyone, and it's always best to consult with a qualified healthcare professional or sports medicine expert before trying ice baths or any other form of therapy.

Regenerate response